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second amendment rights and the second amendment rights of our law-abiding law-ag citizens. we have seen the newtown parents here in washington bravely telling their stories. they deserve better than this body turning their backs on them. the families of aurora deserve better than this body turning their backs on them. the families of more than 30 people who die every single day at the hands of gun violence deserve more from this body. my friends, it is simply time to act. today is the day for this body to show the american people that their voices matter. that when 90% of americans demand us to expand background checks, that we can deliver. we should be able to agree today that we no longer need military-style weapons and ammunition clips on our streets. and we should be able to agree today that it's time to crack down on the illegal handguns being trafficked in our streets into the hands of criminals. four years ago, i met the parents of naisha pryor yard. naisha was a beautiful 17-year-old honor student killed in the prime of her life by an illegal handgun when she was just spending t
and use tax laws and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president, i would object to any further proceedings in regard to this bill. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, the bill will be placed on the calendar. mr. reid: mr. president, today this august body will honor the memory of 20 first-grade children, little babies who were gunned down, most of them shot multiple times. we will also honor the teachers and administrators who were killed that day in newtown, connecticut. but we're also going to honor with this legislation tens of thousands of others who were killed by guns each year here in america. we're going to do that by voting on a number of measures to strengthen the laws to prevent gun violence in this nation. mr. president, the families of innocents killed in newtown, aurora, in carson city, blacksburg, in oak creek and columbine really deserve these votes. where do i stand on these democratic proposals? this afternoon the senate will vote on a compromised background check proposal crafted by senators manchin, toomey, kirk and schumer, all experienced l
of these companies. the bureau can now follow whether laws are being followed from credit origination to debt collection, by identifying problems and rooting them out early we're working to try to minimize consumer harm. our report also encompasses the bureau's first enforcement actions against credit card companies that deceived consumers inch some cases the companies targeted economically vulnerable consumers with low credit scores and low credit limits. we were able to secure $425 million in relief for six million consumers and imposed penalties on the company to deter such activity in the future. these actions will senior as a warning signal for anyone who seeks to profit by misleading consumers inch the second half of 2012 we tackled issues in the market for private student loan debt which currently totals $150 billion outstanding. the studies detail the struggles students and recent graduates are experiencing. together with the education secretary we made recommendations to congress on common sense reform to ensure the risky underwriting practices of the past are not repeated. the work
why now? i want to share a few things. one is that once we start implementing the law and the mechanisms started falling in place and in the first year we got 1,000 cases nudged and then results. .. the mechanism is one thing. the greeting that oxygen, the way we can breed of the greeting as space for rigging a plan and not be bastrop away. women who complain, stigma and retaliation. that is the part that probably would need to focus on. the other thing i felt was that it was really a universal issue. i, during my struggle in the last ten years, have probably read about every sexual-harassment case. and every country, i went to japan a month ago and there it was everywhere in the public place and offices. so i felt like this is something that we really need to a not divide up the world, and this is the part where women have problems and this is a part of the world that has the outcome. we will need to develop a bond of solidarity. when need to talk about our struggles. countries like pakistan, one case of a gang rape or something happens and then it goes into the media
. >> good evening. i'm the director of the yale law library and i'm here to welcome you to the library booktalk sister i want to thank the founders society for cosponsoring tonight's talk. tonight's program features logan beirne who is the author of a new book on america's first chief executive entitled "blood of tyrants: george washington and the forging of the presidency." this is very much a yale law school block. it began as a paper while logan was a law school student. the paper was written -- after graduation from law school in 2008 and working two years in a law firm, logan returned to yale law school in 2010 as a scholar and began turning the paper into the book that we feature tonight. appropriate laid we have the professor with those to comment on the book. professor is a highly distinguished member of the yale law school factoid. is the author of numerous books, monographs and articles, and several of his books have been featured in previous book club series sponsored by our library. according to a recently published study by my colleague, fred sugar, professor eskridge is
. ratified by the senate or the law of the land. and it sounds to me like one of the punchlines of your account, even though washington powers did grow, he did have a republican understanding, which required him to be very attentive to the commitments that were made by the nation. in the 1770s, we were not in position to make international commitments, but we did it with didn't have a lot of statutes on the book, but we have resolutions. would you not say when it washingtons experiences the commander-in-chief has a constitutional obligation to take seriously the commitment the nation has made in conventions like the geneva convention. .. >> i think it's important for the commander-in-chief to be looking at commitments that we make. >> others? more questions? speeches? opinions about canada? [laughter] >> [inaudible]. >> the former dean wants to make a speech about her youth. [laughter] >> i spent many summers canoeing in canada and singing every morning oh, candidate, which is beautiful. for that reason i made a point in junior high school of studying the history of canada, and why i ha
tragedy to a law office in san francisco in 1993. where a crazed gunman -- i remember his name but i won't say it -- with an assault weapon killed eight people and wounded six. one of those people was a brave warrior who threw his body over the body of his wife, sacrificing his own life to save hers. now, that young man was one of my son's best friends, and i know personally how these horrific and senseless tragedies live on with the survivors. the parents, the spouses, the children, the family and the friends. it changes their lives and it pierces their hearts forever. so i've told you a couple of stories about california, but let me say this. let's look at what's happened across this nation since sandy hook. in the 120 days since sandy hook, more than 2,200 americans have been killed by gun violence. hardly anyplace was spared. now, we know there are many, many firearms in america. 300 million firearms in the united states. if you were to divide that up, that would be one gun per person. of course, there are many people who just have many, many guns. now, this is a 50% increase in the
with our government's top national security priority, which is the lawful effective and humane interrogation of this subject for the purposes of gathering intelligence. the boston attacks were clearly inspired by the violent ideology of transnationallist islamist terrorism. so we need to learn everything we can about what foreign terrorists or terrorist groups the suspect and his brother might have associated with, whether they were part of additional plots to attack our nation, and what other relevant information the suspect may possess that could prevent future attacks against the united states or our interests. i think we need to delve further into this whole issue of the education that some people who are motivated by these base ideologies obtain over the internet and the effect that it's having. we should at least know about that. our civilian justice system offers a responsible option for striking this balance with american citizens. it allows the justice department to delay reading a suspect his miranda rights if doing so is in the interest of -- quote -- "public safety.
. >> recognized experts in law, medicine and ethics. the group includes conservatives and liberals, republicans and democrats. and you can find her biographical information in the press kit and in the report itself. the constitution project is enormously grateful to the members of the task force for their diligence, dedication, time and courage. they all contribute a remarkable expertise and stake their considerable personal and professional reputation to produce this report. i also want to thank the staff that guided the task force, which was extraordinarily diligent, meticulous, and hard-working. the american public owes both the task force members and the staff a debt of gratitude. eight a the 11th of the task force are here today, as is neil lewis, the task force's wonderful executive director. i'm pleased to introduce one of the groups co-chairs, ambassador james jones will begin the presentation. thank you. >> thank you very much for the introduction. let me first say that personally and on behalf of the task force members, i want to express our sympathy and our solidarity with the people
by tennessee law. and if you don't, well then you don't have to do business in tennessee. it's just that simple and fair. in terms of imposing a new tax, this bill does not create one new tax. first, there are no federal taxes in here, none. and second, we don't even have the power to impose a new state tax, a state sales tax, nor would we try. no new taxes. simply a question of compliance and collecting the taxes already owed in the 46 states that currently have sales and use taxes. i urge my colleagues to come forward tonight at 5:30, vote for cloture on the motion to proceed. let us engage in this important debate. let us not put this off another day, another week, another month. let's bring this to a conclusion in the senate with a good, wholesome debate on a bipartisan basis, germane, relevant, constructive amendments that address some of the issues are welcome. bring them forward and let's not burn up the hours of the day and the hours of the week in quorum calls but let's get down to the business of the senate we were sent to do. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding
, a bill to restore states' sovereign rights to enforce state and local sales and use tax laws, and for other purposes. mr. reid: i ask for a second reading and object to my own request. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, the bill will be read for a second time on the next legislative day. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate recess subject to the call of the chair. the presiding officer: without objection, the senate stands in recess subject to the call of the chair. >>> one day after the boston bombings a bipartisan watch group said the government used torture and illegal interrogation methods after the september 11 attacks in 2001. that report is next on c-span2. >>> she came into the white house, she was a 47-year-old lady that he did politics. she was deeply depressed at the death of her son and especially under the terrible circumstances in which she died. she didn't have many friends unfortunately, but she did have a wonderful family there always seems to be somebody there and i don't think he did very much but she was a very intellectual woman,
--from personal grievance to public law". the book describes what happened when 11 women joined the campaign to go into the un only to be attacked by there un managers. the case culminated in legislation by the pakistani parliament in 2000 that make sexual harassment crime. she is the chair person, and human rights and democracy streaming and research on news activism and environment. and based in washington d.c. at the national endowment for democracy. and over red light areas, released by oxford and forgotten cases. and in japanese have become popular among young pakistani women. and the doctorate working at the university of minnesota. please join in welcoming today's guest dr. fouzia saeed. [applause] >> very nice to be here and i look forward to the next hour of engagement with you. if you want to turn this off you can, at least up to the limit. i am going to tell you a story today and the stories in the context of pakistan, about one woman and also celebration of women in pakistan but it resonates universally, goes across borders. this is about a legislation we got in pakistan against sexual
background is in the law and, actually, he began his background in law at his family's kitchen table. his father, rex lee, was a law school dean, assistant u.s. attorney general and solicitor general for ronald reagan. senator lee is a graduate of brigham young university and byu law school, was a law clerk for judge dean benson of the u.s. district court of the district of utah and then judge sam alito's clerk when he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rd circuit. he served as an attorney -- assistant u.s. attorney general in utah and general counsel to the governor of utah before turning to private practice. and then in 2010, that important election year, he decided to run united yorking out an -- knocking out an incumbent u.s. senator and a party-endorsed candidate to become the primary candidate and win the general election. senator lee is now on the judiciary committee, serves as ranking member of the antitrust competition policy and consumer rights subcommittee. he also sevens on the armed service -- serves on the armed services committee and the joint economic committee and
,ming. mr. presiden this amendment protects the privacy and sety of law-abiding gun owners. when government officials release gun ownership information it puts many lives at risk. this includes the lives of lawful gun owners, the lived of law enforcement and the lives of ctheic violence. state or local governments that release private gun owner information will be penalized 5% of their federal program funding. this includes the release of private information on individuals 0 who have licenses to purchase or who possess or who carry firearms. the funding that's withheld will then be redistributed to the states that are in compliance. this amendment will ensure that gun owners across the nation do not have their private gun owner information publicly released. thank you, mr. president. and i urge all my colleagues to support the amendment. mr. leahy: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: this is a case of washington being big brother and telling each one of the states whether it's wyoming, vermont, or connecticut here's what you have to do. we have no idea
in for a long time. the law requires that. beyond that we don't know for sure. we have had difficult negotiations over the second part that have the guest worker program and make sure that it's both at will and contract so it serves all of agricultural. because we know at some point we need additional workers beyond the highly trained skilled workers that are currently doing the work in the country that are likely to get a blue card. there will be additional workers needed down the road. we have to a viable worker program. the current program is not that program. if we have the blue card program in our existing h2a we would be back here in a few years, senator, telling you we have a big problem. >> my time is . >> that's what we've got avoid. we have to make sure we don't make the same mistake as 1986. >> thank you. we have two unique situations on the committee, as we mentioned with senator cornyn who had to be absent and all of us understand why. there's no question he should have been in texas and was. the other senator feinstein who is handled the ag negotiations. both will be gi
don't have to pay, and diplomatic protections for the egregious violations of law. you can't take it to criminal court, but to the table to negotiate with those who tell you we're the only people, we, the jewish people, with rights in this land. these cold, hard realities of how u.s. policy grievancely harms palestinians are screened from the u.s. public. we bombarded, especially on television, instead, with dishonest rhetoric what is described as progress in a so-called peace process which extensively consistented of negotiations between near equals under the impartial gays of an honest american broker, all supposedly intended to create an independent palestinian state. i'm arguing that this is not what is actually happening. this is not what has happened for 35 years. what has happened is the continuation and the intensification and the reenforcement of the dispersal of the organization and colonization of the pal stippian people and their homeland. the united states, in fact, has never really operated as an honest broker between the palestinians and israel. i never talked to an
that we all have given through congress. i don't know what the law is spent we will make a request on that and appreciate your follow up on it. we go now to karen bass of california. >> thank you, mr. chair. i want to congratulate secretary kerry on your appointment, and also join my colleagues in expressing my condolences. >> thank you. >> i look forward to working with you, and especially working with the committed men and women at the state department. i have to tell you that i've really enjoyed working directly with the state department and i'm honored to have an excellent pearson fell in my office who i am looking forward to continuing to work with me. as the ranking member of the african subcommittee all wanted to share with you several priority issues i hope you will consider. first of all come u.s.-africa trade relations. number two, the importance of development assistance programs, including global hiv/aids funding through pepfar. number three, support for peacekeeping operations. as you know the u.n. is considering establishing a peacekeeping force and mali and there's a
of retirement and health care benefits is consistent with what is required by the federal law of ups, federal express and every other almost every other corporation in the country it would be very similar. >> it could be different from what the private sector companies are doing. i would like to know, i would like to make that available to the postal employees that i represent throughout the country. >> you are correct but it's not the same for health care benefits. i will provide a more detailed record. >> you are saying the postal service now is operating at 140% of current revenue; is that the number you gave? >> drm laes, unfunded liabilities. >> bankruptcy would probably be where they are. >> finally let me go to something completely unrelated. you testified he wanted more flexibility in their rates in respect to packaging the monopoly on first-class they would have it facto monopoly on the third clause catalogs and what people would refer to as door hangers and nobody has the reach you do. how do you give that flexibility without giving you the power to do sweetheart deals and take the
the audience. please wait until you get a microphone before u.s. to because of laws we will pick you up on camera. u.s. a question? down here in front. you have to wait for the microphone. and copley's to do as a favor. not accusing you, don't make a speech. as the question. >> my question is whether their is a real parallel between the argument for abolishing slavery and the argument for abolishing war. >> sounds like that's yours. >> the question is, is there real parallel? i don't know. the point that i was trying to make was i think every generation does seven things and italy. we do things that make us more -- morally queasy, but we think we have to do them. i would say that for our generation as for pretty much every generation before us, war is one of those things. again, ask for a show of hands. how many people think the war is a good thing and have many people think that war should never be used as a policy? >> we are then obviously all conflicted. i think if you look back on previous generations, to think that we can't morally understand how honest, sincere people could believ
, under secretary norman went in and froze the the 1981 bill that became law, that the reagan tax cut we are talking about earlier so it was a practical handle. the neat thing that you recount again five years later it didn't make a difference. four or five years later by 1984 there were 40 other organizations doing knockoffs of what the mandate for leadership had been. >> when i interviewed the president of other think tanks in washington d.c. brookings and c s i s and kato, i said what difference has the heritage approach to research made? all the difference in the world. the brookings president said we now do what heritage first started so heritage really, and i say that in the book, change the think tank culture of washington d.c.. >> one of the neatest things that i can say among all of you, 25, 30 years ago when phil and i were just getting our feet wet at heritage there weren't 600 people in the united states who knew what a think tank was. 600,000 people have voluntarily supported us. that is incredible. incredible impact. >> glad you mentioned that because there is no other thin
rush. one came from massachusetts, from harvard and yale law school. so was an odd mix. one was a politician, businessman, double dealer, self-promoter, who became the first superintendent of yellowstone national park. the sent one, whose father had followed the gold rush, was a soldier, a humble cavalry lieutenant who is also a self-taught scientist, brilliant man, phenomenal writer, who wrote the first great account of the exploration of yellow stone in 1870 that was haled at the time by the leading scientist office the day as the greates writings sip lewis and clark, and the third was the harvard and yale law school bookish hype ocon dry yack scholar, who became like men in the west, driven by fear, for a of the others he walked from independence, iowa to the montana gold rush. acted the politician and future superintendent, and like a lot of white men who settled there, he became an exterminationist. i think about the conversation in the earlier panel about the problem for historians out presentism. how you impose the moral assumptions and values of the present on the re
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
the measures in the streamlined sales and use tax law, which 24 states have already done, including my little state of west virginia. do you know that we were the number three state in the nation to join in this fairness movement many years ago, and when i was governor, we worked very hard to work with the other states and we built up to 24 states that basically were acceptable towards a tax code fairness, and that's really what it was about. or a state can meet five mandates. there is five mandates they can meet. they can notify retailers of rate changes. they can create a single organization for collecting sales tax. they can establish a uniform tax base, or they can use destination sourcing for sales tax rates and provide free software and hold harmless protection for retailers to simplify what that means. some states might have different tax codes in different counties. some counties have different taxes that they add on to their sales tax or they have a municipal tax. and they're saying that will be 9,600 different tax codes, it's almost impossible. for anyone to participate in this piec
of a bank account or something, you know. if you think unilaterally the dictator for a day passed one law, what would you do? that's definitely a major flaw in the republican thinking. they assume we're going to be dictator for one day and limit government by doing that. in fact we're dictators for life and government gets bigger. to get to the spirit of your question, i think if we could reverse or somewhat change the relationship between the federal government and the states, i think that is the most lasting thing to serve to limit government. the vision of competing multiple jurisdiction of preventing consolidation of power is valid and valid in this century as well. the senates go hat and hand in washington asking for federal money. >> hi, spencer with the "daily caller" you reference the mythical permanent majority of the republican party. of course they disappeared. now we see a vision the establishment fading way. tea party segment is rising. do you think that is a permanent influence on the modern republican party now? if so give that is a grassroots movement is there anything you
and the district of columbia that do not recognize some form of conceal gun carry law. in other words, it is part of the public policy of 49 states that conceal handgun licenses may be obtained by lawful owners. our amendment would allow persons with concealed handgun permits to carry those weapons as they travel between jurisdictions and not -- and avoid any sort of prosecution. this does not create a national standard. it does not apply to jurisdictions that don't otherwise recognize the right to conceal carry. and it would act, in effect, like a driver's license so you don't have to get a separate driver's license in each state that you travel through. and for those who believe background checks that are important, this is background checks on steroids. i'd ask my colleagues to support the amendment. mr. schumer: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new york. mr. schumer: yeah, this amendment would wreak havoc in large portions of america, suburban and urban areas. now, the bottom line is very simple. wyoming, maybe concealed carry works. every police officer in america -- a
delegation, all the law enforcement leadership. we have several people that want to present to you this morning and take your questions. a couple of points i want to mention at the outset. i told you yesterday that the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. special agent in charge rick deslauriers will speak shortly. it is important to clarify that two and only two explosive devices were found yesterday. other parcels, all other parcels in the area of the blast have been examined and there are no unexploded bombs. there were no unexploded explosive devices found. over 150 people were injured yesterday in the, in the blasts, some gravely. our thoughts go out to all those injured and killed and to their families and friends. i personally want to thank the extraordinary first-responders for their just extraordinary work yesterday. every single one of them, those who were on site and those who got to the site promptly thereafter performed beautifully as have the area hospitals. i've been calling around to the heads of the hospitals personally to thank them as well. it is a our hope
human rationality. people do all kinds of really stupid things. we enact stupid laws sometimes that a lot of people agree on more because certain interest groups influence others. look at the gun legislation. yeah it's for the failure to enact it is driven by the economic interest of a certain small bunch of businesses but is that really why a huge number of other individuals who believe that's a good thing to do or wildly misinterpret the second amendment because they feel it within themselves. with regard to slavery and you jumped off from that, one of the things that became and has become clear to me the more i have delved into the world of the slave owner it's self and indeed the pre-emancipation north where it wasn't really all that different, is that a lot of people really liked slavery. they liked it. yes it was profitable but it wasn't always all that profitable and a motivator particularly in the 19th century was much of the south it was up into the respectable middle class to own a slave. it gave you a status in the stature that you might not have otherwise so why did
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